[35] After the breakwater was completed Nobby's Beach formed against it and over the reefs around Nobby's headland. The 'Pasha Bulker' storm caused $1.6 million damage Of the five lows which pummelled Australia on June 8 and 9, 2007 the “Pasha Bulker” storm was the most significant. [23] This resulted in the decision to make another attempt after the salvage crews could regroup. During its 150-minute peak the gale, with gusts of up to 172 km/h, buffeted the whole region and caused incredible damage. [6], After Pasha Bulker ran aground the 22 Filipino and Korean crew members aboard were successfully rescued by the Westpac Rescue helicopter service from the vessel, which grounded about 30 m (98 ft) from shore at the popular Nobbys Beach. [2][3] While waiting in the open ocean outside the harbour to load coal, Pasha Bulker ran aground during a major storm on 8 June 2007 on Nobbys Beach in Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. Other notable east coast lows occurred in … This is especially the case when a ship, like the Pasha Bulker was at the time, is “light” (not containing cargo) because more of the hull is up out of the water and exposed to the wind and sea. The ship was towed into Newcastle harbour where minor repairs were carried out while a decision on where major repairs would be completed was made. [3][30] Salvage costs of A$1.8 million were finally paid in July 2008. Sydney Airport had mean wind speeds of 50km/h or stronger for 44 hours up until 5am on Wednesday - easily beating the 28 hours of such winds during 2007 east coast low … Working in the other direction is draft: a deep draft vessel will have a lot of “grip” on the water to counteract windage. The trail of mistakes and incompetence began on the evening of June 7 when warnings about an approaching storm were issued to 56 ships anchored off Newcastle. [32], Pasha Bulker left the port of Newcastle on 26 July 2007. [36] It could not be refloated and was dismantled on-site. Soon after the attempt started to shift the ship, one of the cables connecting the ship to the tug boat Keera snapped dashing the attempt. [citation needed], Final preparations to refloat the ship began on 28 June 2007 when the ballast water, added earlier to stabilise the vessel, was pumped out to aid buoyancy. Pasha Bulker is now rolling heavily, beam-on to the heavy swell and wind, on a heading of 220 at more than 2.5 knots. However, two separate oil slicks were detected in the vicinity of Pasha Bulker, prompting concerns about a potential oil spill. started to … The wind was strong gale force with 8 m high seas and 41 ships were at anchor. Pasha Bulker beaching has also drawn parallels to the 1974 beaching of MV Sygna on Stockton beach, some 8 km (5 mi) further north, and Cherry Venture, which was beached during a storm in 1973 on Teewah Beach near Rainbow Beach in Queensland. Another significan storm was the June Longweekend Storm of 2007 (Pasha Bulker Storm). Pasha Bulker The had been in the Newcastle anchorage since 23 May and anchored about 2.5nM (4.6km) off the coast. Notice that the Pasha Bulker June 2007 storm series has been used for the unseen model validation. Working in the other direction is draft: a deep draft vessel will have a lot of “grip” on the water to counteract windage. 107 0 obj <>stream 2014) is named after the bulk carrier bearing the same name that was beached by the storm on the Newcastle coast on the morning of 8 June 2007. For a recent example of what can happen, Google “Pasha Bulker”. [2][4][5], Early on the morning of 8 June 2007, Newcastle Port Corporation radioed the 56 moored ships waiting off the coast to load coal to warn them to move out to sea to escape an approaching storm. ... CAWCR Tech Report on Pasha Bulker storm. 89 0 obj <>/Filter/FlateDecode/ID[<8D6E06C15E07D518A6E6E52B0EDC4F2A>]/Index[74 34]/Info 73 0 R/Length 80/Prev 437684/Root 75 0 R/Size 108/Type/XRef/W[1 2 1]>>stream The ship beached on the morning of Friday 8 June just before the height of the storm that afternoon. ]NG�j��I�)x�H@PHu��W��J�;���{&3�3��(�$b�IF"N8�A$I$�R�D��T4|"��Q��0Aw39�NJ��Ђ� Fa5�QDP#A�D�+("B�bTqC�~ ��7q�䛘�O��_\�lS@�t�(��(3����;^��xY:���u/g�/~�g�����zL�k1�� c�ߑ�jgA��òO�By0�om�q�m���;�-� WMp�l����@�hpm�Ѐs�V�ӎ���2{� ��!��`8�_���(Y����4��/�g[�I|�n�� ��I�:�"���9���u�r]� ��d�.����%4�����U��Y����=�e����1�m�Ȗ��)xH7��.�ۣ4�W�I^=b�4�3�[�h�/�:1�_��v V^ϻ��lގ/�����5d���-؄�k���M�)� ˘pu"�׏���x��,'�ë���x����8��<=�n� ���w0{���!N��!�g�%. Wettest member (22) 10 KM + WV IMAGERY 06 UTC APRIL 21. ABC Newcastle. Lasers beamed messages such as "Coal causes climate change chaos" and "This is what climate change looks like" in red on the side of the ship. (2010) ... mum wind gust speed recorded was 135 km/h at Norah Head, followed by 125 km/h at Nobbys Head at 1.30 am 9 June (Figure 3b). 1.6. ... Wettest member (22) WIND AND P AT Z=1KM, 12UTC APRIL 22. As the sun hit the shore, locals woke up to find a massive coal ship right on the beach . [11] Pasha Bulker was even advertised on eBay for a short time, with bids reaching $16,000,000 before eBay closed the auction. While waiting in the open ocean outside the harbour to load coal, Pasha Bulker ran aground during a major storm on 8 June 2007 on Nobbys Beach in Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. Pasha Bulker storm 13 Queensland floods 15 5.1 Meteorological context 15 5.2 CASE STUDY: The 2008 Floods in Queensland – ... with estimated storm maximum wind gusts up to 20% greater. “The captain of the ship was trying to reverse it and then jerk the bow into the teeth of the storm, so he was reversing down towards Nobbys.” “There is a great shot that [former Herald photographer Darren Pateman] got of the Pasha Bulker being hit by a wave and was bent almost over the rocks at the Cowrie Hole.” 50 km. Wamberal's erosion issues date back to a 1974 storm when houses along the foreshore toppled into the ocean. NSW: 'Where's the Sygna?' On the morning of the 8th June, the Pasha bulker was struggling hugely with conditions - massive swell up to 17.9mtrs - which would ultimately see it stranded at Nobbys beach. A full description of the meteorology of the Pasha Bulker storm is given in Mills et al. [10] One radio station promoted a song called "Blame it on the Pasha Bulker", a rewrite of the song, "Blame it on the Bossa Nova".